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ECOLOGICAL DEBT, ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE & CLIMATE CHANGE

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The ADC campaign puts a spotlight on private companies that invest in coal and fossil fuels, and the banks and financial institutions that fund them despite calls for keeping the Earth’s temperature at livable levels. We call on companies that continue to invest in dirty energy to make a #TotalCoalExitNow.

Asia's Dirty Companies

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Women and the crisis of land, food, water, and climate changeIn Asia, agriculture remains the main form of productive economic activity, relied upon for livelihoods by an estimated 2.2 billion people. The sector continues to serve as a major source of food and feed crops, not only in countries across Asia but the whole world.

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The review compares the initial climate action pledges, called Intended Nationally Determined Contributions, of countries to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change to their actual fair share of climate action.

FAQs: Fair Shares - A Civil Society Equity Review of INDCs

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Based on Asian Conference on Energy and Asian Climate Justice Assembly Discussions

Towards an Asian Platform on Transforming Energy Systems© Daniel Berehulak/Getty assets

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The World Bank’s Culpability in Climate ChangeThe World Bank Group’s Carbon Projects in the Asia-Pacific Region (1949-2010)

The World Bank further elbowed its way into the climate change negotiations and infrastructure when in 2010, the 16th Conference of Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) invited the World Bank to serve as the interim trustee of its Green Climate Fund, the operating entity that will manage the financial mechanisms of the Convention.

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A Comparison of Pledges: Who Plans to Act?The Stockholm Environment Institute has recently issued a report that examines four detailed studies of countries’ mitigation pledges under the Cancun Agreements, for the purpose of comparing developed (Annex 1) country pledges to developing (non-Annex 1) country pledges.

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Building on the Bali MandateRobust mandates already exist to conclude negotiations covering 100% of global emissions. In Bali, in 2007, the world agreed to a negotiating roadmap that consisted of three essential pillars: a second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol for developed countries; a compromise for the United States; as well as developing country action backed by finance, technology and capacity building.

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At Stake in Durban: A Climate Deal for the 1% or the 99%?A civil society analysis of mitigation issues in the Durban talks

It’s a planetary and humanitarian emergency… The world is already reeling from major humanitarian emergencies exacerbated by climate change: floods in Thailand and Pakistan, landslides from extreme rains in many Latin American countries, and the multi-year drought in the Horn of Africa that threatens the lives of millions.

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GHG Emissions in Tons per CapitaInformation taken from UN Data

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Towards a Peoples’ Agenda On Climate Finance: A Part of our Platform for Climate JusticeClimate change is a grave and urgent threat to life on earth on a global scale. The challenge is great, but greater still for countries of the South and the majority of the peoples of the South who stand to bear the brunt of its most harmful consequences because of accumulated economic and social vulnerabilities throughout history till the present.

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An Open Letter to the Governments of the World Meeting at the UNFCCC in CancunPeople and communities throughout the global South need hundreds of billions of dollars each year to deal with the impacts of climate change, build resiliency and adopt alternative development pathways. The cost of compensation for past, present, and future damages due to climate change will only grow if, in addition, the necessary measures are not taken in the industrialized countries to make a just transition to equitable, non-fossil fuel based economies.

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Briefer on the Green Climate Fund (GCF), The World Bank as Trustee and the Transitional CommitteeThis briefer is drawn from the “Outcome of the work of the Ad Hoc Working Group on long-term Cooperative Action under the Convention (unedited version)” released during the UNFCCC in Cancun.

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Climate Justice Briefs

A wealthy minority of the world’s countries and corporations are the principal cause of climate change; its adverse effects fall first and foremost on the majority that is poor. This basic and undeniable truth forms the foundation of!the global climate justice movement. – The climate debt primer

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A Platform for Climate Justice of Asian Movements, Organizations and NetworksWe believe that solving the climate crisis and injustice – requires basic transformation of the global system – economic, political, socio-cultural. Given the narrow window of time to prevent catastrophic, irreversible consequences of the climate crisis – we must work even harder to hasten the process of profound social transformation, relying first and foremost on the collective strength, action and solidarity of peoples’ movements within our countries and across borders.